Metal Works http://metalworks.co/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 16:20:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://metalworks.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-31-120x120.png Metal Works http://metalworks.co/ 32 32 AMADA presents new manufacturing offerings at FABTECH 2021 https://metalworks.co/amada-presents-new-manufacturing-offerings-at-fabtech-2021/ https://metalworks.co/amada-presents-new-manufacturing-offerings-at-fabtech-2021/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/amada-presents-new-manufacturing-offerings-at-fabtech-2021/ AMADA Presents New Manufacturing Offerings at FABTECH 2021 | SME media Skip to content > Source link]]>

AMADA Presents New Manufacturing Offerings at FABTECH 2021 | SME media










Skip to content




Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/amada-presents-new-manufacturing-offerings-at-fabtech-2021/feed/ 0
An introduction to the fabrication of metal parts https://metalworks.co/an-introduction-to-the-fabrication-of-metal-parts/ https://metalworks.co/an-introduction-to-the-fabrication-of-metal-parts/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/an-introduction-to-the-fabrication-of-metal-parts/ Metals like aluminum, titanium, iron and nickel are the building blocks of modern society – constituting countless objects that are part of our daily lives. From extremely hard to very malleable, these elements have different properties that require specific technologies and manufacturing approaches. These are also known as metal fabrication. By a simple definition, metal […]]]>

Metals like aluminum, titanium, iron and nickel are the building blocks of modern society – constituting countless objects that are part of our daily lives.

From extremely hard to very malleable, these elements have different properties that require specific technologies and manufacturing approaches. These are also known as metal fabrication.

By a simple definition, metal fabrication is the manufacturing process of shaping metal into parts and finished products. From connecting parts like technical attachments to big machines like airplanes, metal fabrication is responsible for items in almost every industry and every area of ​​our life. Likewise, metal fabrication shops around the world dedicate their expertise to everything from mass-produced products to custom parts.

An_introduction_to_the_making_of_metallic_pieces.png

There are several processes involved in metal fabrication, the ease of use of which depends on the type of metal and product. Each process often falls into one of two main categories: removal and deformation. Below, we’ve compiled a detailed look at some of these various processes and their importance.

Removal process

One of the main methods of making metals is to remove a significant portion of a metal part. Different elimination processes produce different results. Some of them include:

Machining

Considered the foundation of metal fabrication, machining is a subtractive shaping process that removes leftover metal to create a shape. Over the past 150 years, machining tools have evolved from raw pulley and steam mechanisms to today’s ultra-precise and advanced Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining equipment.

There are several different methods that produce CNC parts, such as milling, drilling and turning. Milling is one of the most common methods, which involves multi-point cutting tools that remove metal from the workpiece.

Perforation

Punching is used to make cuts of different shapes. A punch and die tool works the same way as a large pair of scissors; it uses pressure to produce the desired shape and remove excess material. The method can be used to create various shapes and sizes, but the drilled holes are most often geometric shapes like circles, squares, or rectangles. Once cut, the shape is discarded and the sheet is kept as the final product.

erasure

If, on the other hand, the cut part is to be used for the drawing, the method used is cutting. This method is often used to produce multiples of the same shape from a larger sheet of metal. Such examples include the creation of jewelry, watch components, and clockwork gears.

Chopped off

Cutting involves separating a piece of metal – partially or entirely – into two or more sections and is one of the most versatile manufacturing processes. It is known to produce clean, straight cuts through the metal part.

On the surface, it may appear that the method involves nothing more than cutting large chunks of metal into smaller pieces – but it’s a rather complex process that involves lasers, electric scissors, jets of water. and plasma for the production of precise sections.

cut_precise.png

Deformation process

Unlike removal, deformation alters the material instead of removing its parts. As such, it is often used to create 3D shapes. Some of the ways that metallic materials can be deformed are listed below.

Folding

The bending process – which changes the shape of the material – is often carried out with a hammer whose large, flat head is adapted to the deformation of the part. While some hammers are portable, others are connected to a machine. The latter type, also known as a power hammer, is used to apply more force to metal.

Bending can also be done using a press brake – a machine that is used specifically for bending metal parts like sheet metal.

Extrusion

Extrusion is a process that produces objects with a fixed cross section shape, in which metal (hot or cold) is forced through a die with the desired cross section.

Its main advantages over other manufacturing methods are its ability to form complex cross sections and do so with rigid materials because the material is subjected to high compressive stress. It also gives a high quality surface finish and allows great freedom in the design process.

liberty_in_the_design_process.png

Deep drawing

This process is often used for more malleable metals such as copper, aluminum or brass. Deep drawing will stretch the material as a tool applies pressure to the sheet; the result is a cup-shaped material. Tin cans, pots, cups, kitchen sinks, and fuel tanks are all examples of deep drawing metal fabrication.

Spinning

Spinning, or extrusion forming, is a process in which a metal disc or tube is rotated at high speed to form an axially symmetrical part. It can be done by hand or using a CNC lathe. Common spinning applications include cookware, satellite dishes, musical instruments, and rocket nose cones.

Final words

Due to its complexity and versatility, metal fabrication has many applications in all products and industries. However, it is imperative that manufacturers fully understand the processes and materials involved due to their unique and detailed characteristics.

Generally, metal fabrication methods fall into one of two groups: removal and deformation. The processes that incorporate material removal include machining, punching, punching and cutting. On the other hand, deformation processes alter the shape of materials with methods such as bending, extrusion, deep drawing and spinning, among others.

This introduction should give you a first idea of ​​how these methods work and how they are used.


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/an-introduction-to-the-fabrication-of-metal-parts/feed/ 0
In the making of metal, the truth remains https://metalworks.co/in-the-making-of-metal-the-truth-remains/ https://metalworks.co/in-the-making-of-metal-the-truth-remains/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/in-the-making-of-metal-the-truth-remains/ When it comes to tangible products that you can cut, bend, and weld, the truth is harder to hide. This is what makes metal fabrication so great. Getty Images When I heard from Eric Fankhauser, vice president of Toledo Metal Spinning (TMS), telling the story of how his father acquired the business in 1964, I […]]]>

When it comes to tangible products that you can cut, bend, and weld, the truth is harder to hide. This is what makes metal fabrication so great. Getty Images

When I heard from Eric Fankhauser, vice president of Toledo Metal Spinning (TMS), telling the story of how his father acquired the business in 1964, I smiled and nodded. After hearing it I kept thinking, No wonder some people catch the virus from metal fabrication.

Eric’s father, Ken, started his career not as an entrepreneur in a job store or as a handyman in a garage, but as an accountant. As an entrepreneur for the accounting firm Ernst and Ernst in the 1960s, Ken audited TMS and did such a good job that the company’s president and founder, Rudolph Bruehner, sent him a check for $ 100.

“It put my dad in a dilemma,” Eric said. “It would have been a conflict of interest if he had cashed that check.”

He spoke to his contacts at Ernst & Ernst, who told him to approve the check to the company’s partners. “Rudy got really pissed off,” Eric said. “He called my dad into his office and told him he was upset he didn’t keep the money. My father explained to him that it was a conflict of interest.

“Rudy thought about it, then finally said, ‘You’re the kind of guy I would like to have run this business. “Would you be interested in buying it?” Ken, along with his brother Bill, an aeronautical engineer, finally did just that.

A German immigrant, Bruehner started TMS in 1929, one hell of a year to start a business. But the workshop has survived, relying on an old-fashioned sheet metal craft foundation. Even to this day, many metal spinning operations cannot be fully automated, due to the variation in material properties and all the subtle interactions that can occur between the roll and a spinning disc or preform on it. a lap.

Old MAKER Longtime industry columnist and consultant Dick Kallage used to say, “Truth happens in the workshop. He wasn’t the first to say it and he probably won’t be the last. Much of modern business relies on the intangible. The entire financial services industry is based on intangible human inventions. And when business is built on the intangible, it becomes easier to hide the truth.

Accountants can certainly hide the truth, as can managers who are evaluated and rewarded not on the quality of the parts’ manufacture or the reliability of their delivery, but on the quality of the numbers. Several years ago I spoke with Drew Locher from Change Management Associates. He described a phenomenon common in many manufacturing plants called the “hockey stick scenario”, with the stick end (revenues) up towards the end of the financial reporting period – a strange coincidence, given that sales did not win new orders. or recorded more sales from the existing business. Instead, managers perform a bit of accounting magic. They ask production managers to ship a large, profitable order due much later (after the financial reporting period).

“Forget about our current commitments,” Locher said. “Forget about delivery times. We have to do the numbers this month.

Walk to the workshop and the myth of the hockey stick disappears. Operators and supervisors know they are told to put pending orders on hold, even late ones. They shake their heads in resignation and focus on the process, the tool cutting and shaping the metal. In this arena of tangible actions and physics, the truth cannot be hidden for long, especially if those who seek it know the process inside and out.

Of course, ignoring the process can keep the truth hidden. In a laser cutting service, for example, someone may complain that the material they are cutting is inferior in quality and has poor cut edges as evidence. Thus, the supervisor and the main operator observe the laser in action. Even long, thin pieces don’t seem to grow back terribly after cutting, so residual stress doesn’t seem to be an issue, at least for this quality and thickness of material. Observers ask when was the last change of the cutting head protection glass. It turns out the operator simply replaced it a few days ago and reset the cutting parameters, which had been changed slightly as the cover glass aged.

The chief laser operator looks at the cutting parameters and raises his eyebrows. When someone changed the cutting settings to give the protective glass a little more life, they changed the default settings. So when an operator changed the protective glass and reset the cutting parameters, it would not revert to the original default values. The laser wire changes the parameters, starts the program and burr-free parts appear. The truth has come out of hiding.

A successful metal fabrication shop needs knowledgeable people who seek the truth. The closer these people are to where the tool (or laser beam) comes in contact with the metal, the better.

Bruehner saw this appreciation for truth in Ken and Bill Fankhauser in the 1960s. No doubt, he would not be surprised if the store is still flourishing nearly a century after its founding. At TMS, and in the thousands of successful metal fabrication shops across the country, the best people share this appreciation for unfiltered truth. To riffle The Grand Lebowski, in metal fabrication, the truth remains.


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/in-the-making-of-metal-the-truth-remains/feed/ 0
Paperless Parts – How Oversized Sheet Metal Fabrication Quotes Are Costing You https://metalworks.co/paperless-parts-how-oversized-sheet-metal-fabrication-quotes-are-costing-you/ https://metalworks.co/paperless-parts-how-oversized-sheet-metal-fabrication-quotes-are-costing-you/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/paperless-parts-how-oversized-sheet-metal-fabrication-quotes-are-costing-you/ Sponsored content The description: Are you spending too much time designing sheet metal fabrication quotes? At Paperless Parts, we have seen hundreds of quotes being developed using different methods. Estimating and quoting take a considerable amount of time in sheet metal fabrication shops. Often times, the more experienced employees or the store owners themselves carry […]]]>

Sponsored content

The description:

Are you spending too much time designing sheet metal fabrication quotes? At Paperless Parts, we have seen hundreds of quotes being developed using different methods. Estimating and quoting take a considerable amount of time in sheet metal fabrication shops. Often times, the more experienced employees or the store owners themselves carry out these activities because they are critical and have a direct impact on the business. But estimating and citing doesn’t need to bog your team down. Especially when studies show that 7 out of 10 quotes sent do not generate any income. In this webinar, Jason Ray, Co-Founder and CEO of Paperless Parts, will show you how modern technology can help you get the right information from the data you generate in the quotation process to reduce the time spent overestimating the quotations. Find out how you can take advantage of part geometry to generate cost and pricing formulas. With this data and the automation of the quote process, your team can spend less time designing quotes and more time on the shop floor completing jobs and training junior employees.

Presenter:

Jason Ray – Co-founder and CEO of Paperless Parts

Jason Ray is the co-founder and CEO of Paperless Parts, the manufacturing platform that enables machine shops to streamline communications, build quotes faster and more accurately, improve the experience. client and develop their business. Jason discovered his passion for manufacturing while serving in the Pentagon in the United States Navy as a Supply and Logistics Officer, where he led the implementation of advanced manufacturing. Seeing the negative impacts associated with inefficient supply to production companies in the short term, Jason was determined to address this critical issue plaguing manufacturing. Jason holds a BA from Trinity College and an MBA from Babson College.

Log in or create an account for instant access to this archived webcast.


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/paperless-parts-how-oversized-sheet-metal-fabrication-quotes-are-costing-you/feed/ 0
Hard steel: manufacturing serves as the backbone of manufacturing https://metalworks.co/hard-steel-manufacturing-serves-as-the-backbone-of-manufacturing/ https://metalworks.co/hard-steel-manufacturing-serves-as-the-backbone-of-manufacturing/#respond Thu, 24 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/hard-steel-manufacturing-serves-as-the-backbone-of-manufacturing/ Manufacturers across the upstate strive to create everything from cars and airplanes to engines, with their goods shipped across the country and around the world. Often, these manufactured products are carefully assembled with metal parts that are cast, fabricated or cut. Due to its strength, steel is the material of choice for these products. Several […]]]>

Manufacturers across the upstate strive to create everything from cars and airplanes to engines, with their goods shipped across the country and around the world. Often, these manufactured products are carefully assembled with metal parts that are cast, fabricated or cut. Due to its strength, steel is the material of choice for these products. Several companies here in the upstate provide these companies with the Steel fabrication – manufacture various components needed to create the cars we drive, the buildings where we work and the infrastructure we need.

Provide the products needed for construction

One of these companies is Kloeckner Greenville, the upstate branch Kloeckner Metals Company. The company, listed on the German stock exchange, manufactures and distributes steel and metal products. In 2017, it announced its investment of $ 11.3 million to expand its manufacturing facility at 1 White Horse Road, The Northern State Business Journal Previously reported. Greenville County received $ 100,000 from the Economic Development Co-ordinating Council to help cover site preparation costs.

This expansion included a 50,000 square foot bay with 43 ton cranes and a new highly automated slitting line fully capable of processing advanced high strength steels and aluminum.

Kloeckner Metals bought Mac Steel in 2011, which included its Greenville plant.

“South Carolina’s world-class workforce continues to demonstrate an unmatched level of excellence and as a result companies like Kloeckner Metals continue to grow and prosper in our state. I congratulate this great company and look forward to everything we know it will achieve in Greenville County ”, Governor Henry McMaster said at the time.

The company ships carbon and non-ferrous metals from inventory held at its 42 locations across North America.

The 200,000 square foot White Horse Road facility serves Kloeckners customers across Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee, according to the Kloeckner website. . The Greenville plant employs approximately 85 workers.

Kloeckner Metal Corporation’s sales are about 7 billion euros, or about $ 8.3 billion, according to Bob DeMarco, executive vice president of Kloeckner. In North America, the company’s sales are approximately $ 3 billion.

“The Southeast has grown over the past 20 years or so as manufacturing has moved south,” DeMarco said. “South Carolina and our Greenville site have certainly benefited from this migration. “

In its facilities, the company cuts, cuts to length and sells coils. “And we sell various long products in a lot of markets – long products being beams, channels, angles, rounds, squares, plates, plates, tubes, pipes, stuff like that,” he said. declared DeMarco.

Many of Kloeckner’s customers work in the HVAC and automotive manufacturing industries and use these steel parts to make their own products.

The results of the pandemic

While other industries have suffered from the novel coronavirus pandemic, DeMarco said Kloeckner Metals has not seen a significant impact. “Business has not fallen to the level that we initially thought it would,” he said.

During the economic shutdown, Kloeckner, like many manufacturers, was not ordered to shut down.

“At our 42 locations, we have been rated as critical in all of the states in which we operate,” said DeMarco. “Fortunately, we haven’t had any locations closed for a while due to COVID. We have strong policies in place to protect our employees, to protect our customers. “

Around 83,000 employees worked in blast furnaces and steel mills that produced steel for companies like Kloeckner Metals in 2019. Source: Statista.

While DeMarco said trade industry data showed business was down about 30% when the pandemic started around April, it is now down about 15%. The company had to downsize in some places and switch to four-day work weeks, but DeMarco said the company was “on the rise.”

“It wasn’t a V-shaped recovery, but you can see it like the Nike swoosh, right? So here is that bottom of the V, and then it started to come up, then halfway, maybe a little more than halfway, ”DeMarco said.

The situation of steel production

The entire steel industry has suffered due to COVID-19 in what Barron reported was “obvious and some means not so obvious”. The sector has had to contend with a drop in demand as some automotive and construction projects are halted, but steel prices have risen. In May, scrap metal prices rose 13% from a year ago, according to the outlet.

Steel production has changed for years. The pandemic, DeMarco said, has hit factories producing hard steel – due to the closures Barron’s mentioned.

Structural fabrication refers to the cutting, bending and joining of steel to create different products. When fabricating metal frames, several pieces of steel are combined to form different structures of predefined sizes and shapes for assembly in buildings, industrial equipment, tools, and various other end products. Source: Kloeckner Metals Corporation

“I have been in the steel business for 34 years now. And that has been a problem for my entire 34 years: overcapacity in steel production, ”said DeMarco. “Many countries have built factories… to try to do something about their employment situation.”

However, he continued, whenever one was built somewhere, another elsewhere was closed.


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/hard-steel-manufacturing-serves-as-the-backbone-of-manufacturing/feed/ 0
Vitex expands space in aluminum manufacturing plant https://metalworks.co/vitex-expands-space-in-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/ https://metalworks.co/vitex-expands-space-in-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/#respond Mon, 07 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/vitex-expands-space-in-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/ Global vehicle producer Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) is conducting research in the UK on how best to use scrap aluminum from household appliances and end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) for use in future JLR models, thereby reducing the company’s CO emissions.2 up to 26 percent of emissions. The company says research related to its REALITY aluminum project […]]]>

Global vehicle producer Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) is conducting research in the UK on how best to use scrap aluminum from household appliances and end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) for use in future JLR models, thereby reducing the company’s CO emissions.2 up to 26 percent of emissions.

The company says research related to its REALITY aluminum project has already “revealed how an innovative recycling process” could help it achieve its goal.

JLR describes the REALITY aluminum project as “a key part of Jaguar Land Rover’s Destination Zero mission to reduce carbon emissions and its ambition to make societies safer and cleaner environments through relentless innovation.”

The company says its engineers were able to use scrap aluminum and mix it with a smaller amount of primary aluminum “to form a new prototype alloy tested, comparable to existing Jaguar Land Rover quality and quality.”

Recycled content aluminum alloys are commonly used in the production of cast aluminum engine parts around the world. In 2014, the Jaguar XE used a grade RC5754 aluminum alloy, which contains up to 75% recycled aluminum, for its body panels. The company claims that these XE body structures were manufactured with recycled aluminum content “made possible through a closed-loop manufacturing system at our facilities in the UK and Slovakia”.

In 2018, JLR reached an agreement with Novelis for this aluminum producer to supply recycled metal for its Advanz (EV) electric vehicle.

The £ 2million ($ 2.65million) JLR REALITY project, co-funded by Innovate UK and in partnership with Brunel University of London, is helping Jaguar Land Rover expand its closed loop and aluminum recycling initiatives in the framework of Destination Zero. According to JLR, between September 2013 and March 2020, approximately 360,000 metric tonnes of closed loop scrap was transformed into “lightweight aluminum-intensive architecture, across all vehicle lines, including the Jaguar XE.”

“As we move into an autonomous, connected and electrified future, with the potential to decommission shared fleets en masse, this could allow Jaguar Land Rover to design this closed-loop recycling alloy under tight production schedules to further improve efficiency and environmental benefits, ”said Gaëlle Guillaume, Senior Project Manager for REALITY at JLR .


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/vitex-expands-space-in-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/feed/ 0
Understand the latest alloy verification technologies for the production and fabrication of tubes and pipes https://metalworks.co/understand-the-latest-alloy-verification-technologies-for-the-production-and-fabrication-of-tubes-and-pipes/ https://metalworks.co/understand-the-latest-alloy-verification-technologies-for-the-production-and-fabrication-of-tubes-and-pipes/#respond Fri, 20 Mar 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/understand-the-latest-alloy-verification-technologies-for-the-production-and-fabrication-of-tubes-and-pipes/ Even when a pipe and tube producer or manufacturer obtains their material from a reliable source, checking metal alloys using technologies such as LIBS, OES, and XRF is a good idea to avoid material mix-ups. Image provided by Thermo Fisher Scientific Advances in technology are making many tools smaller, faster, and easier to use, and […]]]>

Even when a pipe and tube producer or manufacturer obtains their material from a reliable source, checking metal alloys using technologies such as LIBS, OES, and XRF is a good idea to avoid material mix-ups. Image provided by Thermo Fisher Scientific

Advances in technology are making many tools smaller, faster, and easier to use, and so are materials identification instruments used in the production and fabrication of tubes and pipes. Mobile optical emission spectroscopy (OES), portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are all examples of portable instruments with the power to perform laboratory analyzes on field. . Portable elemental analyzers allow users to test materials on the shop floor in seconds to determine their elemental composition, verifying that the metal used in production meets required specifications.

Positive Material Identification (PMI) capability helps mitigate risk and improve productivity, but it can be difficult to determine which of these three analytical techniques is best for tube and pipe producers and fabricators. . An overview of how OES, XRF, and LIBS systems work, and the benefits they offer tube and pipe manufacturers, can go a long way in making a sound investment in equipment.

How they work

A non-destructive test, XRF irradiates the test sample with high-energy X-rays produced by a miniaturized X-ray tube in the instrument. This causes the atoms in the sample to emit secondary (or fluorescent) X-rays specific to the elements present in the sample. The instrument’s detector measures and analyzes these characteristic secondary X-rays to determine their chemical identity and concentration in the metal being tested. This capability makes XRF useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the composition of materials.

Rather than emitting X-rays like an XRF analyzer, OES instruments send out a high voltage electrical pulse to excite atoms in a sample. The sample then discharges an arc spark which can be measured and analyzed by a spectrometer in the OES unit. From there, the OES system determines the chemical composition of the sample being tested.

LIBS analyzers ablate the surface of the sample with a highly focused laser, which produces a plasma composed of electronically excited atoms and ions. These atoms begin to decay in their ground states and emit wavelengths of light, unique to each element, which are analyzed by a spectrometer in the LIBS device. As with XRF, LIBS analysis can be used for both quantitative and qualitative measurements.

Of the three, XRF is the only one classified as non-destructive; OES and LIBS are minimally destructive in that they leave a scorch mark on the sample.

Productivity considerations

Considerations to keep in mind when choosing a basic analyzer include portability, measurement speed, and ease of use.

Portability can have a substantial impact on productivity. Both LIBS and XRF are available as lightweight portable analyzers, with some LIBS units weighing as little as 6 pounds. This means that analysis can be performed anywhere in the factory or warehouse, as well as in hard-to-reach areas in the field. A mobile OES can weigh up to 80 pounds and requires a cart.

Factors that contribute to speed and ease of use include:

Sample preparation – Mobile OES and LIBS generally require sample preparation as even traces of contaminants such as grease, paint and oxidation can lead to unreliable results. Sample preparation involves cleaning and grinding a square inch of test area on the metal. XRF rarely requires sample preparation.

Instrument configuration – XRF is point-and-shoot technology that does not require daily setup. Daily setup of LIBS is relatively minimal, requiring a two-step process that takes approximately 10 minutes. Daily setup of the OES requires several steps and 15-20 minutes, and both instruments require regular cleaning.

Analysis speed – Depending on the material tested, the advanced LIBS and OES analyzers can test most samples in about 10 seconds. This includes materials in which the carbon content is of interest. An XRF analyzer, for most materials, can identify and provide the chemistry of many types of alloys in 3-5 seconds. However, this does not include carbon analysis, and the analysis time may increase slightly if other light elements are present in the alloy. A few seconds may not seem like a lot of time, but seconds add up quickly in situations that may require multiple average readings or when multiple samples need to be analyzed. Therefore, choosing the right technology is important for any application where higher throughput is the goal.

Hardware considerations

Tube and pipe producers and manufacturers need to consider more than just productivity when choosing an elemental analyzer. The three technologies differ in their analytical capabilities, so it is important to match the capabilities to the materials to be tested.

LIBS and OES are both useful for differentiating alloys and quantifying carbon concentrations in low alloy steels, carbon steels, and stainless steels. This includes the low carbon content of L grade stainless steels.

XRF provides rapid chemistry and quality verification of incoming raw materials and final products, and it can be used for composition analysis and to measure the thickness of alloy coatings. In the case of steel pipes, for example, a coating can be applied to prevent oxidation during storage and transport or to facilitate the application of paint. The ability to analyze coating layers helps ensure quality control and reduce coating waste.

Often, XRF and LIBS may be required to perform extensive quality control of end products. These complementary devices can be used throughout the production process, from testing of incoming materials to outgoing quality assurance or quality control of finished tubes, pipes and assemblies.

Trust but verify

As the industry continues to globalize, many tube and pipe producers and manufacturers increasingly purchase materials from overseas, and these may include new suppliers that they have not worked with before. . Unfortunately, material test reports may not always be accurate. A trust but verification approach is therefore necessary to confirm the composition of the material sent by the supplier. This is where analytical technology comes in.

Inexperienced or unreliable vendors may try to keep costs down by not performing PMI in-house, or they may not use an outside testing lab to verify the equipment they ship. The consequences of mixing materials can range from end user rejection to catastrophic failure that can result in injury or even death. For example, using an inferior material in a critical application, such as an aircraft engine, puts the safety of everyone on board at risk. By exercising due diligence in performing the PMI on site, pipe and tube producers and manufacturers can go a long way in protecting their reputation and their business. Using elemental analysis to quickly spot problems avoids the costly problem of determining that products have been developed out of specification after adding value during the production process. Often the manufactured part or assembly must be completely scrapped.

Checking materials does not stop at entry control. Supervisors and those responsible for quality control must ensure that the right materials are used throughout the production process, so best practices require PMI at every stage of production. Highest compliance uses a testing protocol that follows the part, assembly, or equipment through the production process until final validation.

For critical components, a PMI should be the first step upon receipt of shipment, and inspections should continue to the point of installation. For facilities prior to the inspection process (for example, a 30-year-old refinery), performing a thorough validation may require a shutdown to verify the integrity of components and assemblies that were not submitted. to adequate tests before installation. Full use of PMI technology today may prevent such drastic action in the future.

James Stachowiak is Technical Sales Director of Thermo Fisher Scientific, 168 Third Ave., Waltham, MA 02451, 800-678-5599.


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/understand-the-latest-alloy-verification-technologies-for-the-production-and-fabrication-of-tubes-and-pipes/feed/ 0
Vigor Selects Vancouver Site for All-Aluminum Manufacturing Plant https://metalworks.co/vigor-selects-vancouver-site-for-all-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/ https://metalworks.co/vigor-selects-vancouver-site-for-all-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/#respond Fri, 15 Feb 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/vigor-selects-vancouver-site-for-all-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/ Vigor, a Portland-based shipbuilder with operations in Oregon and Washington, will use its new facility in Vancouver to build a new generation of U.S. Army landing craft called the Maneuver Support Vessel (Light) or MSV (L ). Courtesy of Vigor You can thank one of Vigor’s employees in Vancouver for bringing massive expansion and a […]]]>
Vigor, a Portland-based shipbuilder with operations in Oregon and Washington, will use its new facility in Vancouver to build a new generation of U.S. Army landing craft called the Maneuver Support Vessel (Light) or MSV (L ). Courtesy of Vigor

You can thank one of Vigor’s employees in Vancouver for bringing massive expansion and a billion dollar manufacturing contract to the city.

The company, a Portland-based shipbuilder with operations in Oregon and Washington, announced in early February its intention to purchase the former Christensen Yachts site in the Columbia Business Park. Vigor plans to use the new location to build a new generation of US Army landing craft called the Maneuver Support Vessel (Light) or MSV (L), under a billion dollar government contract. The site, which was brought to the company’s attention by a local employee, will be part of a restructuring that will create around 200 jobs in Vancouver in the near term and 200 more by 2022 or 2023, Jill Mackie said. , senior vice-president of the public service business.

“We were looking for a site to build the MSV (L), and originally thought we could do it in Seattle or Portland at our Swan Island site,” Mackie said. “But we didn’t have enough room at either site to follow the work on the new contract. We weren’t really looking in Vancouver, but someone drew our attention to the building.

It turns out that someone was simply “a local Vigor employee who knew the building” rather than an economic development group. Although after learning about the opportunity, the company contacted the city of Vancouver and other economic development agencies, she said.

The company has 2,300 employees at its seven sites in Oregon, Washington and Alaska, including a few in the city of Vancouver. As part of the restructuring of the new space, approximately 70 workers from Vigor Kvichak in Ballard will have the opportunity to relocate to Vancouver, and the Vigor Kvichak Ballard factory will close. In addition, around 60 workers at the company’s Clackamas plant who focus on aluminum vessels will have the opportunity to relocate – which the company anticipates the most. The new Vancouver facility will focus on building aluminum ships, while other facilities will continue to focus on steel, Mackie said.

“We didn’t originally plan to put all the aluminum work together, but once we saw the capacity of the site, we saw that we could do a lot more than the MSV (L)”, Mackie said. “We knew we could bring many great projects together in one space in Vancouver. “

With the Vancouver site purchased, which is slated for early summer, Vigor plans to move all of its aluminum work to the city, which is expected to be done within the next year. The company plans to spend approximately $ 7 million on equipment and building improvements over the next few years.

The company plans to start operations in Vancouver with around 130 employees, reaching 250 employees by around 2020 and another 150-200 as production of the MSV (L) increases in 2022 or 2023.

Beyond the MSV (L), Vigor also builds Aluminum Combatant Craft Medium (CCM) vehicles for the US Navy and its allies and the Response Boat-Medium (RB-M) for the US Coast Guard and the market. of export. The company is also making fast ferries, an interceptor and commercial aluminum work boats, all of which will be made in Vancouver.

“Vigor’s decision to retain and develop jobs in Washington state is a testament to the high quality of life and workforce we have here,” Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said in a statement. Press. “Our team worked closely with Vigor to find a competitive solution to keep these jobs in Washington and I am happy to see the continued success of one of our great corporate citizens contributing to our economy by creating decent paying jobs. in Vancouver. “

Vigor’s MSV (L) work is still in its early stages. The company must first produce a prototype, which the military will test before requesting modifications or improvements. After that, the company will manufacture four units as part of the low rate production process, these units also being tested by the military. Once these processes are completed, possibly by 2022, full production of the remaining 32 units will begin, Mackie said.

Vigor rendering
This render shows what Vigor’s new all-aluminum manufacturing facility in Vancouver will look like when completed with equipment upgrades and more. Courtesy of Vigor

“In Vancouver, we’ll go through an acceleration process,” Mackie said. “In October 2019, we expect approximately 130 employees to be placed in Vancouver. By 2023, we expect to have around 400. “

Frank Foti, President and CEO of Vigor, said the restructuring will strengthen the company as a whole and make it more competitive in the future.

“The synergies we will achieve by bringing these incredible manufacturers together in one place strengthens our competitive advantage and builds on our long-term goals as an outstanding industrial company,” Foti said in a press release. “Although we have had operations in Vancouver since 1980, this move represents a substantial increase in the number of Vigor employees who will live and work here. Our Vigor team look forward to getting to know the Vancouver community better and to be a force for good through our great people and the economic activity associated with our work.

The company plans to work with local educational organizations like Clark College to build worker pipelines for the new factory. It is already working with Portland Community College for its production facilities in Oregon, but the company also wants to talk about training in Vancouver, Mackie said.

“We have strong partnerships with community colleges in Portland, Seattle, Ketchikan and we will build on the great work being done with the Swan Island Training Center (in our Swan Island Shipyard – the partnership is with the Portland Community College) as well as with our partners at the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) to help with training, ”said Mackie. “We will be talking over the next few months with Clark College to discuss our needs and their programs. We will also discuss with our union partners and our vocational training programs.

The jobs the company hopes to fill are generally well paid and skilled. Production workers earn about $ 60,000 per year, program and production managers earn about $ 80,000 per year. Vigor will be looking for aluminum fabricators, fitters and welders, outfitters, electricians, painters, engineers and production managers, among others.

“The beauty of it all is that we are able to bring all of our aluminum expertise together in one place,” Mackie said. “We are very excited about this. It will make Vigor better and more competitive.

comments

comments


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/vigor-selects-vancouver-site-for-all-aluminum-manufacturing-plant/feed/ 0
Advanced Digital Design and Manufacturing (ADDFab): Central Facilities: UMass Amherst https://metalworks.co/advanced-digital-design-and-manufacturing-addfab-central-facilities-umass-amherst/ https://metalworks.co/advanced-digital-design-and-manufacturing-addfab-central-facilities-umass-amherst/#respond Thu, 14 Jul 2016 23:22:32 +0000 https://metalworks.co/advanced-digital-design-and-manufacturing-addfab-central-facilities-umass-amherst/ Most popular plastic PA2200 (nylon-12) is our state-of-the-art material, providing high resolution, strong and resilient parts. The material is white and can be dyed in a variety of colors (red, blue, green, orange, yellow, pink and black). The best part about this material is that it works with the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process, which […]]]>

Most popular plastic PA2200 (nylon-12) is our state-of-the-art material, providing high resolution, strong and resilient parts. The material is white and can be dyed in a variety of colors (red, blue, green, orange, yellow, pink and black). The best part about this material is that it works with the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process, which doesn’t require support structures and lets you print just about any geometry you can imagine. We print the PA2200 on our EOS P110 printer. (Technical sheet)

Most popular metal “15-5” stainless steel is our most popular metallic material – an iron alloy with 15% chromium and 5% nickel. It is a corrosion resistant stainless steel that can be polished to a mirror finish and heat treated to increase its strength and hardness. We print 15-5 on our EOS M290 printer. (Technical sheet)

Multi-material “Digital materials” are a mixture of UV-curable resins (acrylate chemistry) that can produce rigid or flexible parts, or somewhere in between. The basic materials are called VeroWhite (rigid) and TangoBlack (flexible). They can be combined in the same room, and mixed to make shades of gray, or rooms with rigid and flexible sections combined. We print digital materials on our Stratasys Objet Connex350. (Technical sheet)

Carbon fiber We have two options for heavy duty polymer parts with integrated carbon fiber. “Onyx” is a nylon material with chopped carbon fiber mixed in, and “Continuous Carbon Fiber” is nylon with a carbon fiber thread embedded inside. Both produce incredibly strong plastic parts. (Technical sheet)

  • EOS M290 Metal 3D Printer

    The M290 uses a laser to sinter a bed of metallic powder, allowing the layer-by-layer creation of geometrically complex, high-quality metallic parts. Using the M290, fully functional parts can be designed to be lighter, more complex, and better integrated into an assembly.

    • Materials: Metals, including stainless steel, nickel and others
    • Build volume: 250 x 250 x 325 mm
    • Laser: focus diameter of 100 microns

    eos.info

  • Optomec LENS 450 metal 3D printer

    The LENS 450 works by depositing controlled amounts of metal powder on a work surface and sintering with a laser. The approach allows the machine to be used for parts repair, hybrid manufacturing, as well as full additive manufacturing of parts.

    • Materials: Metals, including stainless steel, nickel and others
    • Build volume: 100 x 100 x 100 mm
    • Printing accuracy: 0.25mm position, 0.025mm linear resolution

    optomec.com

  • EOS Formiga P110 3D Printer

    The Formiga P110 uses a laser to sinter a bed of plastic powder. The process facilitates the creation of batches of parts and enables complex geometries and quality constructions from high strength plastic materials.

    • Material: Polyamide
    • Build volume: 200mm x 250mm x 330mm
    • Layer resolution: 0.100mm

    eos.info

  • Stratasys Objet Connex350

    The Connex350 Object allows the creation of parts with several materials. Materials can be printed separately or in specified proportions, providing a range of mechanical properties. The parts can be any mixture of rigid and flexible materials, creating prototypes with different durometers of hardness, or even flexible overlays on rigid materials.

    • Materials: several exclusive plastic and rubber materials
    • Build volume: 342 x 342 x 200 mm
    • Layer resolution: 16 microns
    • Printing accuracy: 20-85 microns

    stratasys.com

  • Markforged Mark Two Printer

    The Mark Two printer switches between two nozzles to create carbon fiber, Kevlar or fiberglass. The resulting parts have high strength-to-weight ratios that can be used for tooling, assembly, and prototyping.

    • Materials: Nylon with carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass
    • Build volume: 320 x 132 x 154 mm

    markforged.com

  • GCC LaserPro Spirit GLS

    The Spirit GLS enables fast laser cutting and grayscale engraving at 256 levels. In addition to cutting potentially complex geometries in materials like wood and acrylic, it can etch aluminum.

    • Materials: cuts acrylic and wood; engrave aluminum
    • Build Volume: 36 ” x 24 ” x 7 ”
    • Thickness: up to 3/8 “acrylic

    gccworld.com

Internal (UMass)

External

Printing services
SLS – EOS P110 (nylon-12) $ 0.09 / cc $ 0.16 / cc
FFF – Markforged Onyx and Continuous Fiber 2,5x the cost of the mat’l 3.5 x the cost of the mat’l
Item – Connex350 Multi-material 2,5x the cost of the mat’l 3.5 x the cost of the mat’l
Metal – Steels and nickel alloys Contact us for a quote
Hourly equipment
Laser Cutting Machine (Spirit GLS 80W) $ 12 / hour $ 20 / hour
Wire EDM $ 13 / hour $ 20 / hour
Daily equipment
EOS M290 (DMLS metal) $ 360 / day $ 550 / day
Optomec LENS 450 (Metal DED) $ 250 / day $ 400 / day
Material testing equipment
Instron Electropuls E10000 $ 100 / day $ 175 / day
Engineering / design and laboratory services
A laboratory technician $ 50 / hour $ 80 / hour
Design Engineering (Junior) $ 50 / hour $ 80 / hour
Design engineering (senior) $ 135 / hour $ 200 / hour

Remarks:

  1. Use of equipment requires completion of safety training via UMass EH&S and paid training with ADDFab staff
  2. Support for untrained users is available at lab technician rates
  3. Please contact Dave Follette follette@umass.edu for any questions
  4. Rates in effect July 1, 2021. Rates until June 30, 2021-FY21 Fees approved by the specialized service center

Advanced Digital Design and Manufacturing (ADDFab): Printing services, research and training in several advanced additive manufacturing technologies. For metal printing, the installation includes the EOS M290 for direct laser sintering of metal and the Optomec LENS 450 for directed energy deposition. Materials include stainless steels, nickel alloys, cobalt-chromium alloys, and other experimental metal powders. For polymer printing, the installation includes an EOS P110 selective laser sintering printer (material: PA2200, nylon-12), a Stratasys Objet Connex350 material jet printer (VeroWhite, VeroClear, TangoBlack, UV curable materials), a MarkForged Onyx One (nylon with chopped carbon fiber) and a MarkForged Mark Two (nylon with continuous carbon fiber strands). In addition, we have a media blaster, a powder unpacking station, a water blaster and a media cup for post-processing polymer parts. For software, we use Solidworks for 3D CAD modeling and Materialize Magics for STL manipulation and repair.

  • Training is available for every printer and tool in the lab. We also offer hands-on workshops for industry professionals and workforce development, in designing parts for additive manufacturing and operating laser-based 3D printers.

Fees approved by the specialized service center for fiscal year 21

Updated January 2021

The Advanced digital design and manufacturing lab (ADDFab) is available to academic institutions, industry and the local community.

ADDFab has three main goals to serve this diverse customer base: (1) design and print superb metal and polymer parts, (2) support academic research, and (3) provide training and education opportunities.

1. Design and print great parts

Two metallic printers use fine metallic powders to build parts as large as 25x25x30cm with details as fine as 250um. The EOS M290 is a powder bed system that uses Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) to build parts layer by layer while the LENS 450 is a Directed Energy Deposition (DED) system that deposits lines of metal and can produce parts from custom metal alloys.

Three polymer printers cover three different printing technologies. The EOS P110 is a nylon powder bed printer that uses selective laser sintering (SLS) to produce parts. It has a build area of ​​23x20x30cm and can produce details as fine as 250um. The main advantage of the SLS process is that it does not require support structures for the overhanging parts, so it can easily print extremely complex and delicate geometries. EOS-P110The Connex350 is a multi-material printer that can print flexible and rigid materials in one piece, and even mix materials to adjust material properties and colors. Markforged printers extrude nylon filament in a fused filament manufacturing (FFF) process and can print in chopped carbon fiber infused nylon (Onyx) or incorporate a continuous strand of fiberglass, Kevlar, or carbon fiber in each layer.

For customers who need technical or design assistance to prepare parts (or ideas!) For printing, we offer engineering advice on an hourly basis with undergraduates or experienced engineers.

2. Support university research

ADDFab facilities are available for use as a department where our staff does all printing, but also for dedicated use on a daily or weekly basis. Training is available where students and faculty can learn how to operate the equipment and then use it to conduct their own additive manufacturing research.

We also provide printing services and technical support to faculty from all university departments.

3. Training and education opportunities

ADDFab supports undergraduate and graduate courses in additive manufacturing by printing parts, offering tours, and training students in the use of the equipment. We also work in partnership with student groups and high schools.

For industry and the local community, ADDFab is organizing a series of workshops on additive manufacturing. These are intended to broaden the understanding of how 3D printing will affect the manufacturing industry and to provide practical skills using industrial grade 3D printing technology. Both types of courses are offered throughout the year.

If you have any questions on how to work with ADDFab on a future project, please contact us at addfab@umass.edu. We can’t wait to work together!


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/advanced-digital-design-and-manufacturing-addfab-central-facilities-umass-amherst/feed/ 0
Grade 416 stainless steel: properties, fabrication and applications https://metalworks.co/grade-416-stainless-steel-properties-fabrication-and-applications/ https://metalworks.co/grade-416-stainless-steel-properties-fabrication-and-applications/#respond Thu, 04 Feb 2016 08:00:00 +0000 https://metalworks.co/grade-416-stainless-steel-properties-fabrication-and-applications/ Grade 416 stainless steel is a martensitic machining bar, with improved sulfur and phosphorus machinability. This steel is sometimes used in the hardened state or not and strongly tempered, because it has a low cost and is easily machinable. Grade 416 is delivered as a bar. Image Credit: Shutterstock / Alexandru Rosu Martensitic stainless steels […]]]>

Grade 416 stainless steel is a martensitic machining bar, with improved sulfur and phosphorus machinability. This steel is sometimes used in the hardened state or not and strongly tempered, because it has a low cost and is easily machinable. Grade 416 is delivered as a bar.

Image Credit: Shutterstock / Alexandru Rosu

Martensitic stainless steels are designed for high hardness and other properties are compromised to some extent. Their useful operating temperature range is limited by their loss of ductility at subzero temperatures, and loss of strength through superheating at high temperatures.

Compared to common austenitic grades, these steels have lower corrosion resistance. They have resistance to fresh water, dry atmospheres, and mild alkalis and acids, but comparatively less strength than equivalent non-turning grades. Machining grades without high sulfur content, such as 416, are not suitable for marine or other chloride exposure. To achieve maximum corrosion resistance, the steel should be in a hardened condition with a smooth surface finish.

Grade 416 has good resistance to scaling in intermittent service up to 760 ° C and up to 675 ° C in continuous service. It is not recommended for use at temperatures above the appropriate tempering temperature.

Chemical composition

1.4005 Steel EN 10088-3: 2005
Chemical element % Here
Carbon (C) 0.06 – 0.15
Chromium (Cr) 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Manganese (Mn) 0.0 – 1.50
Silicon (Si) 0.0 – 1.00
Phosphorus (P) 0.0 – 0.04
Sulfur (S) 0.15 – 0.35
Molybdenum (Mo) 0.0 – 0.60
Iron (Fe) Balance

Properties

Physical property Value
Density 7.75 g / cm³
Thermal expansion 9.9 x 10-6/ K
Elasticity module 200 GPa
Thermal conductivity 24.9 W / mK
Electrical resistivity 0.57 x 10-6 .m
Mechanical property Value
Constraint of proof 450 min MPa
Tensile strength 650 – 850 MPa

Manufacturing – Must be completed using techniques which allow final heat treatment of hardening and tempering, and poor weldability.

Cold operation – This technique is not recommended. It is only suitable for minor deformations. Cracking will occur with severe deformation.

Hot work – All hot work processes should be performed after uniform heating to 2100-2250 ° F (1149-1232 ° C). Hot work below 1700 ° F (927 ° C) may cause cracking.

Machinability – The metal offers excellent machinability. It has the highest of any commonly available stainless steel, at around 85% that of a free-cutting carbon steel. Machinability is best achieved in a subcritical annealed condition.

Heat treatment – Complete annealing by heating at 815-900 ° C for ½ hour per 25 mm thickness. This is followed by cooling at 30 ° C / hour maximum up to 600 ° C and air-cooled.

Subcritical Annealing – The material is heated to 650-760 ° C and air cooled.

Hardening – Grade 416 can be hardened by heating to 925-1010 ° C, oil quenched and tempered to meet mechanical requirements.

Condition: The range of tensile strength (N / mm² or MPa) QT 650: 650-850

  • QT 900: 900-1050
  • QT 850: 850-1000
  • QT 700: 700-850
  • QT 800: 800-950

Weldability – The weldability is bad. If necessary, low hydrogen grade 410 electrodes can be used. It can be preheated to 200-300 ° C, which is followed directly by an annealing or re-hardening process, or expansion to 650-675 ° C. If the weld does not need to be hard, a grade 309 austenitic stainless steel filler rod can be used.

Applications

The fields of application of grade 416 martensitic stainless steels are the following:

  • Machined parts with automatic screw
  • Washing machine parts
  • Valve parts
  • Gears
  • Pump shafts
  • Motor shafts
  • Studs
  • Bolts and nuts

This information was obtained, reviewed and adapted from documents provided by Aalco – Stockist of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

For more information on this source, please visit Aalco – Stockist of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.


Source link

]]>
https://metalworks.co/grade-416-stainless-steel-properties-fabrication-and-applications/feed/ 0